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#1 06.Sep.18 09:55:43

ridge walker
Member

Skool.

Yesterday children were returning to school and at St Pauls juniors i was taken aback with the amount of cars dropping their children off at the gates or as close as they could on both sides of  the road, some from the estate but others coming off Middleton road, their is no dropping off area but it has an inside car park for teaching staff, my thoughts were how do local residents put up with this every morning, then on passing a line of very young children in red uniforms had just crossed the road from a church building/school where a lollypop crossing lady attends, they were being escorted up to St Pauls but i often see them being walked into Royton along the pavement for swimming lessons i think by 2-4 staff in two's, how neat and tidy and i think this is great to see how much care is taken.

Later that day i drove back along oldham Road when those from the academy and younger ones that may have been from St Annes were all walking towards the hospital filling the pavements and spilling into the road the entire distance, must be a thousand at least and all in blue uniforms, boys and girls together, as i have said before its like an biblical exidus, same with Royton and Crompton and the several schools in that area and High Barn,  its a rare sight as i try to avoid the times they do this but again i was caught out on the tram passing Oldham Collage at King Street with hundreds of students milling about after 10am.

For those who work and start early at 7am and finish late at 6pm thy will never see this, how good was that, i am surprised some still work 9 till 4 and get caught up in this and all the extra traffic, apart from why so many schools are built along main roads or just off them with little or no provision for parents to drop off or pick them up as its never a priority to provide such a facility, yes those walking were a good sign but crickey its amazing as i never see such crowds normally, protest marches or processions or at football matches, even strap hanging on a tram prepares you for it.

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#2 06.Sep.18 12:12:59

Penguin
Member

Re: Skool.

I spent a blissful six weeks driving to work without any hassle and now the chaos has started again.

It's amazing just how many of the older children are incapable of making their own way to the academy - It's not as if it's in a remote location with no public transport nearby!!!

When is half-term?  tongue


Oh Brilliant!  big_smile

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#3 06.Sep.18 12:56:25

Tabbycat
Member

Re: Skool.

I agree with Pengy. Why do these kids need door to door transport anyway? And how do parents get these good jobs where they can finish at 3pm to pick the little sweethearts up from school?


Once you've read a dictionary everything else is just a remix

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#4 06.Sep.18 14:24:53

Erin
Member

Re: Skool.

Depending on the age of the children they need a responsible adult to make sure they get home safely and have someone at home to watch over them, even in the early years of senior school.  The parking around schools is horrendous but people want to take the easiest option and there isn't any way that can be changed apart from the parking restrictions.  I certainly wouldn't like to live along side of a school.

Last edited by Erin (06.Sep.18 14:50:57)

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#5 06.Sep.18 16:09:47

ridge walker
Member

Re: Skool.

The kids from North Chadderton secondary are passing my front window at 3pm, its about a mile walk for them, one came past on his bike 10 minutes ago going like the clappers uphill so greatly impressed with that, lots of them walk but when i went to school it was much further at least  2miles and then i did a paper round mornings and evenings, the newsagents was on the main road at least 1/2 a mile away and from the last delivery it was a mile back home, i hated that one because it was well beyond my round because this old man stopped me once to ask me if i would deliver his, i said yes but he also wanted me to collect his weekly bill and pay it at the shop for him, whenever i knocked at his door his wife refused to pay me and i had to get it off him while he was in bed,  many a time i was wet through with the rain and i never had a coat, sometimes the papers got wet and she shouted at me after i delivered it and called me back to tell me off.

i think i was 12 at the time and the Sunday papers were very heavy to carry, i could only lift half and had to do 2 trips, one day the police found me waiting for the shop to open at 5am as i had gone too early and the owner was fined but i wasnt sacked, all the mornings were sorted and the addresses penciled on as many customers had comics and magazines then, Saturday was the worst as you could not go to the pictures in the afternoon as you had to deliver 2 lots the Pinks and Greens that had the football results that came out after the evening ones, i was thinking how lucky i was there was no free papers then that once were delivered to every house by adults, that would have been fantastic as my deliveries were a mile apart and i had 50, that old man lived in Manchester in Newton Heath miles away but it was my job and i got ten bob a week thats 50p for all those deliveries which equates to 7p each round of 35 to 50 papers.

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#6 06.Sep.18 18:36:26

Tabbycat
Member

Re: Skool.

Blimey Ridge, what a tale! I bet today's kids wouldn't last 5 minutes!

My children all had paper rounds and got wet through but happily they came home and put their clothes in the dryer before going to school. I certainly don't remember them starting at 5am!


Once you've read a dictionary everything else is just a remix

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#7 06.Sep.18 18:41:59

Woody
Member

Re: Skool.

Tabbycat wrote:

Blimey Ridge, what a tale! I bet today's kids wouldn't last 5 minutes!

My children all had paper rounds and got wet through but happily they came home and put their clothes in the dryer before going to school. I certainly don't remember them starting at 5am!





In the 50s & 60s Paper boys were not allowed out till 7am my Cousin delivered for a local shop and some mornings had to stand with a full bag until 7am or the Newsagent faced a fine.


I would if I could but I can't,

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#8 06.Sep.18 20:00:04

exile
Member

Re: Skool.

I was delivering papers from about 1959 I suppose and we couldn’t start till 7am although we could be at the shop before to get the bag ready. We couldn’t deliver Sunday papers till we left school by which time I was working and didn’t want to work Sundays.  I delivered up to Christmas and started work on January 1st.  Yes we got wet on winter mornings and I only had one pair of shoes so had to go to school in wet shoes for which I got into bother because my shoes weren’t polished shiny. I bought a watch with the Xmas tips I got that year my first Good wrist watch. It only gave up the ghost a few years back and I think it is still stashed away somewhere among my rubbish.   Happy Days.


who is bigger Mr Bigger or Mr Biggers son ? the son he is a little Bigger

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#9 08.Sep.18 15:14:54

ridge walker
Member

Re: Skool.

My money was put away and i saved enough for a new bike, a Dawes from Rowbottems at Failsworth Pole, he had a xmas club, my xmas tips took a week to collect and 10p each amounted to £4-5 so that bought my family presents, my dad always got a 2oz packet of St Bruno pipe tobaco and my mam a box of Black Magic.   Yes 7am was the law, for some reason it was light and i rushed to the shop, i remember they let me go with my bag and the police were watching as i was waiting to pick it up, i could see through the window as each bag was made up and put on the counter, there was about 6 delivery boys no girls then, i liked folding the papers up and posting them at the exact same time every day, some were already waiting and opened the door as i went up the paths, i still think paper rounds are very good for young people but i never see any now, are they still around as i see notices for them on newsagents doors, bet they get £5 now or a tenner just for the MEN.

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#10 08.Sep.18 15:30:37

ridge walker
Member

Re: Skool.

Oh before i forget, one of the great days delivering papers was when it snowed, i loved leaving my footprints along the pavements before anyone was up, no sliding or slurring just equally spaced footprints, i would look back and admire the tracks i made, very strange as later i loved walking in the footprints of our ancesters up on the mountains and under snow on the ridges i did the same as dawn broke,  making trails has always been a passion, maybe thats why footpaths feature so much in my posts.

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